Order of candidates on ballot paper confirmed for Lyne election

Election time: The Nationals' Dr David Gillespie, Australian Electoral Commission acting divisional returning officer Scott Morrison, independent Jeremy Miller, Australian Workers Party's Ed Caruana, Australian Labor Party's Phil Costa, United Australia Party's Garry Bourke and Fraser Anning's Conservative National Party's Ryan Goldspring. Other candidates were not present.
Election time: The Nationals' Dr David Gillespie, Australian Electoral Commission acting divisional returning officer Scott Morrison, independent Jeremy Miller, Australian Workers Party's Ed Caruana, Australian Labor Party's Phil Costa, United Australia Party's Garry Bourke and Fraser Anning's Conservative National Party's Ryan Goldspring. Other candidates were not present.

The order of candidates on the ballot paper for the Lyne election has been decided.

The randomised ballot draw was held at the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) office in Manning Arcade, Taree on Wednesday, April 24. It was conducted by acting divisional returning officer Scott Morrison.

Nine candidates will contest the 2019 Lyne election, with six present for the draw.

The candidates in ballot sheet order are:

Phil Costa- Australian Labor Party

Dr David Gillespie- The Nationals

Garry Bourke- United Australia Party

Ryan Goldspring- Fraser Anning's Conservative National Party

Dean McRae- Liberal Democrats

Ed Caruana- Australian Workers Party

Jeremy Miller- Independent

Catherine Zhao- Christian Democrats (Fred Nile Group)

Stuart Watson- The Greens

The federal election is on Saturday, May 18, with early voting to open on Monday, April 29.

According to the AEC, more than 96.2 per cent of eligible Australians are already enrolled to vote. That's a 1.1 per cent increase on the 2016 election.

More than 52 million ballot papers will be printed and transported to voting locations across Australia and overseas.

Electoral commissioner Tom Rogers said the period between the declaration of candidates and the start of early voting is one of the largest logistical aspects of the election.

"In this five-day period we will formally declare candidates, design 159 ballot papers, print and securely deliver around 52 million copies, and ready more than 500 early voting locations in Australia and overseas for the start of polling," Mr Rogers said.

"We are fortunate in Australia to have a range of voting services available to us but these options, combined with Australia's geography, makes it a significant and unique logistical undertaking."